Guide Dr. Math Presents More Geometry: Learning Geometry is Easy! Just Ask Dr. Math

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Dr. Math Presents More Geometry: Learning Geometry is Easy! Just ask Dr. Math!

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You can download and read online Dr. Just Ask Dr. Math file PDF Book only if you are registered here. These postulates may be and were for the Greeks basic assumptions or observations about the way things really are, or they may just be suppositions you make for the sake of imagining something with no necessary connection with the real world.

In the first case, we want to choose facts as postulates that are so obvious that no one would question them; in the second case, we are free to assume whatever we want.

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Spherical geometry follows different rules yet is just as valid as plane geometry. So we have to take as our starting point some postulates that simply define the particular mathematical system we are studying. If we take a different set of postulates, we get a different system, which may be just as useful as the original—and therefore just as true—yet different in its conclusions. The postulates we choose are the connection between the abstract concepts about which we are making proofs and the real-world ideas that they model if any.

Without postulates, we would not have such a connection and would be reasoning about nothing! Math, Is it possible to draw a triangle with more than degrees?

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Thus, the angles in the triangle also add up to degrees: on a flat sheet of paper, a triangle has exactly degrees. However, in a different geometry, a triangle might have more degrees. Math Presents More Geometry which could be as much as degrees. In this case, the triangle must have more degrees than This is just the very beginning of non-Euclidean geometry; it gets much harder. I would like to know if you could explain non-Euclidean geometry to me. Yours truly, Quentin Hi, Quentin, Euclidean geometry assumes that the Euclidean parallel postulate is true.

The postulate states that given any line and any point not on that line, there is exactly one line through that point that is parallel to the given line. As it turns out, you can show that if case A happens somewhere in your geometry, then there are no parallel lines anywhere in your whole geometry. This is pretty amazing.

It means that every pair of lines in this geometry will intersect somewhere. As a consequence, you can show that if case B happens anywhere in your geometry, then it happens everywhere, too. In this geometry, given any line and any point not on that line, there is more than one line through that point that is parallel to the given line.

As it turns out, you can then show that there are infinitely many such parallel lines through your given point and your given line. Now think about rotating that line so that it still goes through the north and south poles, but instead of going through the United States, for example, it goes through Europe. We know that in any geometry, two points determine a unique line. And it seems like in the example above, we have two lines that go through two points: the north and south poles.

In spherical geometry, we define a point to be a single point and its opposite point. Now the north and south poles are considered a single point. However, you will also notice that every line you draw intersects every other line! You can see two great circles in the figure on the following page. We call this the open upper half-plane. There are two kinds of lines in this model. One kind will be half-circles whose center is on the x-axis, and the other kind will be lines that are perpendicular to the x-axis.

In this model, points are just normal points in the plane. A bunch, right? So this is hyperbolic geometry. You probably learned a lot of coordinate geometry in algebra class, so some of this will look pretty familiar. But there are a few ideas that are especially important in geometry. They are formulas that you can easily figure out again on your own, as long as you understand how they work.

We use it when we have the coordinates of points instead of the lengths of segments. Math, What is the midpoint of the line segment whose endpoints are —3,4 and 5,—2? Sincerely, Qian Hi, Qian, To find the midpoint of that segment, we could use the midpoint formula, or we could just reason it out.


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Now we can find the midpoint of each of the sides of the right triangle. For the top of the triangle, we find the x-coordinate of the midpoint by finding the average of the x-coordinates of the endpoints. So the point is 1,4. We can find the midpoint of the right-hand side by finding the average of the y-coordinates of the endpoints. So that point is 5,1.

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We 3 can draw vertical and horizontal lines through those points, and 5,1 1 1,1 they will meet at the midpoint of the hypotenuse. We have found -4 -2 -1 2 4 the halfway point across and the halfway point down. Math, Can you help me with this problem? Given a line going through the points 10,10 and 20,15 , find the coordinates of a third point on the line that is 3 units from the point 10, Quentin Hi, Quentin, To begin with, we need to find the equation of the line. Math Presents More Geometry If a point is 3 units from another point, it means that the distance between the two points is 3 units.

This in turn means that we can use the distance formula which comes from the Pythagorean theorem. This makes a little more sense when you look at the following diagram: The distance between the two points x1,y1 and x2,y2 is the y x2, y2 y2 y1 x1, y1 x1 x2 x length of the hypotenuse of the above right triangle, correct? We use the Pythagorean theorem to find the length of the hypotenuse of a right triangle. The length of the base of this triangle is x2 — x1. You can also write x1 — x2 , because if this happens to be a negative number, it will be squared in the Pythagorean theorem.

The height is y2 — y1 , which can also be written as y1 — y2. Then we get another point that is 5 3 units away from 10,10 but in the opposite direction. Can you figure out why there are only two points on the line that are 3 units away from 10,10? R —Dr. Expand this for N points.

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Part I mathforum. Part II mathforum. Math Forum: Measuring Distances—Triangulation mathforum. Math Forum: Plane History mathforum. Line l is parallel to line m.


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